Republic of the Philippines

Supreme Court

Baguio City

EN BANC

 

ARTURO M. DE CASTRO,

                               Petitioner,         

 

                   - versus -

 

JUDICIAL AND BAR COUNCIL (JBC) and PRESIDENT GLORIA MACAPAGAL ARROYO,

                    Respondents.

x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - x

JAIME N. SORIANO,

                                Petitioner,         

 

                    - versus -

 

JUDICIAL AND BAR COUNCIL (JBC),

                    Respondent.

x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - x

PHILIPPINE CONSTITUTION ASSOCIATION (PHILCONSA),

                                Petitioner,         

     

                   - versus -

  

JUDICIAL AND BAR COUNCIL (JBC),

                   Respondent.

x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - x

IN RE APPLICABILITY OF SECTION 15, ARTICLE VII OF THE CONSTITUTION TO APPOINTMENTS TO THE JUDICIARY,

ESTELITO P. MENDOZA,

                                Petitioner,         

 x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - x

JOHN G. PERALTA,

                                Petitioner,         

                   - versus -

 

JUDICIAL AND BAR COUNCIL (JBC).

                     Respondent.

x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -x

PETER IRVING CORVERA;

 

CHRISTIAN ROBERT S. LIM;

 

ALFONSO V. TAN, JR.;

 

NATIONAL UNION OF PEOPLES LAWYERS;

 

MARLOU B. UBANO;

 

INTEGRATED BAR OF THE PHILIPPINES-DAVAO DEL SUR CHAPTER, represented by its Immediate Past President, ATTY. ISRAELITO P. TORREON, and the latter in his own personal capacity as a MEMBER of the PHILIPPINE BAR;

 

MITCHELL JOHN L. BOISER;

 

BAGONG ALYANSANG BAYAN (BAYAN) CHAIRMAN DR. CAROLINA P. ARAULLO; BAYAN SECRETARY GENERAL RENATO M. REYES, JR.; CONFEDERATION FOR UNITY, RECOGNITION AND ADVANCE-MENT OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES (COURAGE) CHAIRMAN FERDINAND GAITE; KALIPUNAN NG DAMAYANG MAHIHIRAP (KADAMAY) SECRETARY GENERAL GLORIA ARELLANO; ALYANSA NG NAGKAKAISANG KABATAAN NG SAMBAYANAN PARA SA KAUNLARAN (ANAKBAYAN) CHAIRMAN KEN LEONARD RAMOS; TAYO ANG PAG-ASA CONVENOR ALVIN PETERS; LEAGUE OF FILIPINO STUDENTS (LFS) CHAIRMAN JAMES MARK TERRY LACUANAN RIDON; NATIONAL UNION OF STUDENTS OF THE PHILIPPINES (NUSP) CHAIRMAN EINSTEIN RECEDES; COLLEGE EDITORS GUILD OF THE PHILIPPINES (CEGP) CHAIRMAN VIJAE ALQUISOLA; and STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT OF THE PHILIPPINES (SCMP) CHAIRMAN MA. CRISTINA ANGELA GUEVARRA;

 

WALDEN F. BELLO and LORETTA ANN P. ROSALES;

 

WOMEN TRIAL LAWYERS ORGANIZATION OF THE PHILIPPINES, represented by YOLANDA QUISUMBING-

JAVELLANA; BELLEZA ALOJADO DEMAISIP; TERESITA GANDIONCO-OLEDAN; MA. VERENA KASILAG-VILLANUEVA; MARILYN STA. ROMANA; LEONILA DE JESUS; and GUINEVERE DE LEON;

 

AQUILINO Q. PIMENTEL, JR.;

Intervenors.

x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -x

ATTY. AMADOR Z. TOLENTINO, JR., (IBP

GovernorSouthern Luzon), and ATTY. ROLAND B. INTING

(IBP GovernorEastern Visayas),

Petitioners,

 

- versus -

 

 

JUDICIAL AND BAR COUNCIL (JBC),

Respondent.

x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - x

PHILIPPINE BAR ASSOCIATION, INC.,

Petitioner,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

- versus -

 

 

 

 

 

JUDICIAL AND BAR COUNCIL and HER EXCELLENCY GLORIA MACAPAGAL-ARROYO,

Respondents.

G. R. No. 191002

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G.R. No. 191032

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G.R. No. 191057

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.M. No. 10-2-5-SC       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G.R. No. 191149

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G.R. No. 191342

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G.R. No. 191420

 

Present:

 

PUNO, C.J.,

CARPIO,

CORONA,

CARPIO MORALES,

VELASCO, JR.,

NACHURA,

LEONARDO-DE CASTRO,

BRION,

PERALTA,

BERSAMIN,

DEL CASTILLO,

ABAD,

VILLARAMA, JR.,

PEREZ, and

MENDOZA, JJ.

 

Promulgated:

 

April 20, 2010

x-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------x

 

R E S O L U T I O N

 

BERSAMIN, J.:

 

On March 17, 2010, the Court promulgated its decision, holding:

 

WHEREFORE, the Court:

 

1.      Dismisses the petitions for certiorari and mandamus in G.R. No. 191002 and G.R. No. 191149, and the petition for mandamus in G.R. No. 191057 for being premature;

 

2.      Dismisses the petitions for prohibition in G.R. No. 191032 and G.R. No. 191342 for lack of merit; and

 

3.      Grants the petition in A.M. No. 10-2-5-SC and, accordingly, directs the Judicial and Bar Council:

 

(a) To resume its proceedings for the nomination of candidates to fill the vacancy to be created by the compulsory retirement of Chief Justice Reynato S. Puno by May 17, 2010;

 

(b) To prepare the short list of nominees for the position of Chief Justice;

 

(c) To submit to the incumbent President the short list of nominees for the position of Chief Justice on or before May 17, 2010; and

 

(d) To continue its proceedings for the nomination of candidates to fill other vacancies in the Judiciary and submit to the President the short list of nominees corresponding thereto in accordance with this decision.

 

SO ORDERED.

 

 

Motions for Reconsideration

 

 

Petitioners Jaime N. Soriano (G.R. No. 191032), Amador Z. Tolentino and Roland B. Inting (G.R. No. 191342), and Philippine Bar Association (G.R. No. 191420), as well as intervenors Integrated Bar of the Philippines-Davao del Sur (IBP-Davao del Sur, et al.); Christian Robert S. Lim; Peter Irving Corvera; Bagong Alyansang Bayan and others (BAYAN, et al.); Alfonso V. Tan, Jr.; the Women Trial Lawyers Organization of the Philippines (WTLOP); Marlou B. Ubano; Mitchell John L. Boiser; and Walden F. Bello and Loretta Ann P. Rosales (Bello, et al.), filed their respective motions for reconsideration. Also filing a motion for reconsideration was Senator Aquilino Q. Pimentel, Jr., whose belated intervention was allowed.

 

We summarize the arguments and submissions of the various motions for reconsideration, in the aforegiven order:

 

 

 

Soriano

 

1.     The Court has not squarely ruled upon or addressed the issue of whether or not the power to designate the Chief Justice belonged to the Supreme Court en banc.

 

2.     The Mendoza petition should have been dismissed, because it sought a mere declaratory judgment and did not involve a justiciable controversy.

 

3.     All Justices of the Court should participate in the next deliberations. The mere fact that the Chief Justice sits as ex officio head of the JBC should not prevail over the more compelling state interest for him to participate as a Member of the Court.

 

Tolentino and Inting

 

1.     A plain reading of Section 15, Article VII does not lead to an interpretation that exempts judicial appointments from the express ban on midnight appointments.

 

2.     In excluding the Judiciary from the ban, the Court has made distinctions and has created exemptions when none exists.

 

3.     The ban on midnight appointments is placed in Article VII, not in Article VIII, because it limits an executive, not a judicial, power.

 

4.     Resort to the deliberations of the Constitutional Commission is superfluous, and is powerless to vary the terms of the clear prohibition.

 

5.     The Court has given too much credit to the position taken by Justice Regalado. Thereby, the Court has raised the Constitution to the level of a venerated text whose intent can only be divined by its framers as to be outside the realm of understanding by the sovereign people that ratified it.

 

6.     Valenzuela should not be reversed.

 

7.     The petitioners, as taxpayers and lawyers, have the clear legal standing to question the illegal composition of the JBC.

 

Philippine Bar Association

 

1.     The Courts strained interpretation of the Constitution violates the basic principle that the Court should not formulate a rule of constitutional law broader than what is required by the precise facts of the case.

 

2.     Considering that Section 15, Article VII is clear and straightforward, the only duty of the Court is to apply it. The provision expressly and clearly provides a general limitation on the appointing power of the President in prohibiting the appointment of any person to any position in the Government without any qualification and distinction.

 

3.     The Court gravely erred in unilaterally ignoring the constitutional safeguard against midnight appointments.

 

4.     The Constitution has installed two constitutional safeguards:- the prohibition against midnight appointments, and the creation of the JBC. It is not within the authority of the Court to prefer one over the other, for the Courts duty is to apply the safeguards as they are, not as the Court likes them to be.

 

5.     The Court has erred in failing to apply the basic principles of statutory construction in interpreting the Constitution.

 

6.     The Court has erred in relying heavily on the title, chapter or section headings, despite precedents on statutory construction holding that such headings carried very little weight.

 

7.     The Constitution has provided a general rule on midnight appointments, and the only exception is that on temporary appointments to executive positions.

 

8.     The Court has erred in directing the JBC to resume the proceedings for the nomination of the candidates to fill the vacancy to be created by the compulsory retirement of Chief Justice Puno with a view to submitting the list of nominees for Chief Justice to President Arroyo on or before May 17, 2010. The Constitution grants the Court only the power of supervision over the JBC; hence, the Court cannot tell the JBC what to do, how to do it, or when to do it, especially in the absence of a real and justiciable case assailing any specific action or inaction of the JBC.

 

9.     The Court has engaged in rendering an advisory opinion and has indulged in speculations.

 

10.    The constitutional ban on appointments being already in effect, the Courts directing the JBC to comply with the decision constitutes a culpable violation of the Constitution and the commission of an election offense.

 

11.    The Court cannot reverse on the basis of a secondary authority a doctrine unanimously formulated by the Court en banc.

 

12.    The practice has been for the most senior Justice to act as Chief Justice whenever the incumbent is indisposed. Thus, the appointment of the successor Chief Justice is not urgently necessary.

 

13.    The principal purpose for the ban on midnight appointments is to arrest any attempt to prolong the outgoing Presidents powers by means of proxies. The attempt of the incumbent President to appoint the next Chief Justice is undeniably intended to perpetuate her power beyond her term of office.

 

IBP-Davao del Sur, et al.

 

1.      Its language being unambiguous, Section 15, Article VII of the Constitution applies to appointments to the Judiciary. Hence, no cogent reason exists to warrant the reversal of the Valenzuela pronouncement.

 

2.      Section 16, Article VII of the Constitution provides for presidential appointments to the Constitutional Commissions and the JBC with the consent of the Commission on Appointments. Its phrase other officers whose appointments are vested in him in this Constitution is enough proof that the limitation on the appointing power of the President extends to appointments to the Judiciary. Thus, Section 14, Section 15, and Section 16 of Article VII apply to all presidential appointments in the Executive and Judicial Branches of the Government.

 

3.      There is no evidence that the framers of the Constitution abhorred the idea of an Acting Chief Justice in all cases.

 

Lim

 

1.     There is no justiciable controversy that warrants the Courts exercise of judicial review.

 

2.     The election ban under Section 15, Article VII applies to appointments to fill a vacancy in the Court and to other appointments to the Judiciary.

 

3.     The creation of the JBC does not justify the removal of the safeguard under Section 15 of Article VII against midnight appointments in the Judiciary.

 

Corvera

 

1.     The Courts exclusion of appointments to the Judiciary from the Constitutional ban on midnight appointments is based on an interpretation beyond the plain and unequivocal language of the Constitution.

 

2.     The intent of the ban on midnight appointments is to cover appointments in both the Executive and Judicial Departments. The application of the principle of verba legis (ordinary meaning) would have obviated dwelling on the organization and arrangement of the provisions of the Constitution. If there is any ambiguity in Section 15, Article VII, the intent behind the provision, which is to prevent political partisanship in all branches of the Government, should have controlled.

 

3.     A plain reading is preferred to a contorted and strained interpretation based on compartmentalization and physical arrangement, especially considering that the Constitution must be interpreted as a whole.

 

4.     Resort to the deliberations or to the personal interpretation of the framers of the Constitution should yield to the plain and unequivocal language of the Constitution.

 

5.     There is no sufficient reason for reversing Valenzuela, a ruling that is reasonable and in accord with the Constitution.

 

 

 

BAYAN, et al.

 

1.     The Court erred in granting the petition in A.M. No. 10-2-5-SC, because the petition did not present a justiciable controversy. The issues it raised were not yet ripe for adjudication, considering that the office of the Chief Justice was not yet vacant and that the JBC itself has yet to decide whether or not to submit a list of nominees to the President.

 

2.     The collective wisdom of Valenzuela Court is more important and compelling than the opinion of Justice Regalado.

 

3.     In ruling that Section 15, Article VII is in conflict with Section 4(1), Article VIII, the Court has violated the principle of ut magis valeat quam pereat (which mandates that the Constitution should be interpreted as a whole, such that any conflicting provisions are to be harmonized as to fully give effect to all). There is no conflict between the provisions; they complement each other.

 

4.     The form and structure of the Constitutions titles, chapters, sections, and draftsmanship carry little weight in statutory construction. The clear and plain language of Section 15, Article VII precludes interpretation.

 

 

Tan, Jr.

 

1.     The factual antecedents do not present an actual case or controversy. The clash of legal rights and interests in the present case are merely anticipated. Even if it is anticipated with certainty, no actual vacancy in the position of the Chief Justice has yet occurred.

 

2.     The ruling that Section 15, Article VII does not apply to a vacancy in the Court and the Judiciary runs in conflict with long standing principles and doctrines of statutory construction. The provision admits only one exception, temporary appointments in the Executive Department. Thus, the Court should not distinguish, because the law itself makes no distinction.

 

3.     Valenzuela was erroneously reversed. The framers of the Constitution clearly intended the ban on midnight appointments to cover the members of the Judiciary. Hence, giving more weight to the opinion of Justice Regalado to reverse the en banc decision in Valenzuela was unwarranted.

 

4.     Section 15, Article VII is not incompatible with Section 4(1), Article VIII. The 90-day mandate to fill any vacancy lasts until August 15, 2010, or a month and a half after the end of the ban. The next President has roughly the same time of 45 days as the incumbent President (i.e., 44 days) within which to scrutinize and study the qualifications of the next Chief Justice. Thus, the JBC has more than enough opportunity to examine the nominees without haste and political uncertainty.

 

5.     When the constitutional ban is in place, the 90-day period under Section 4(1), Article VIII is suspended.

 

6.     There is no basis to direct the JBC to submit the list of nominees on or before May 17, 2010. The directive to the JBC sanctions a culpable violation of the Constitution and constitutes an election offense.

 

7.     There is no pressing necessity for the appointment of a Chief Justice, because the Court sits en banc, even when it acts as the sole judge of all contests relative to the election, returns and qualifications of the President and Vice-President. Fourteen other Members of the Court can validly comprise the Presidential Electoral Tribunal.

 

 

WTLOP

 

1.     The Court exceeded its jurisdiction in ordering the JBC to submit the list of nominees for Chief Justice to the President on or before May 17, 2010, and to continue its proceedings for the nomination of the candidates, because it granted a relief not prayed for; imposed on the JBC a deadline not provided by law or the Constitution; exercised control instead of mere supervision over the JBC; and lacked sufficient votes to reverse Valenzuela.

 

2.     In interpreting Section 15, Article VII, the Court has ignored the basic principle of statutory construction to the effect that the literal meaning of the law must be applied when it is clear and unambiguous; and that we should not distinguish where the law does not distinguish.

 

3.     There is no urgency to appoint the next Chief Justice, considering that the Judiciary Act of 1948 already provides that the power and duties of the office devolve on the most senior Associate Justice in case of a vacancy in the office of the Chief Justice.

 

Ubano

 

1.     The language of Section 15, Article VII, being clear and unequivocal, needs no interpretation

 

2.     The Constitution must be construed in its entirety, not by resort to the organization and arrangement of its provisions.

 

3.     The opinion of Justice Regalado is irrelevant, because Section 15, Article VII and the pertinent records of the Constitutional Commission are clear and unambiguous.

 

4.     The Court has erred in ordering the JBC to submit the list of nominees to the President by May 17, 2010 at the latest, because no specific law requires the JBC to submit the list of nominees even before the vacancy has occurred.

 

Boiser

 

1.     Under Section 15, Article VII, the only exemption from the ban on midnight appointments is the temporary appointment to an executive position. The limitation is in keeping with the clear intent of the framers of the Constitution to place a restriction on the power of the outgoing Chief Executive to make appointments.

2.     To exempt the appointment of the next Chief Justice from the ban on midnight appointments makes the appointee beholden to the outgoing Chief Executive, and compromises the independence of the Chief Justice by having the outgoing President be continually influential.

 

3.     The Courts reversal of Valenzuela without stating the sufficient reason violates the principle of stare decisis.

 

 

 

Bello, et al.

 

1.     Section 15, Article VII does not distinguish as to the type of appointments an outgoing President is prohibited from making within the prescribed period. Plain textual reading and the records of the Constitutional Commission support the view that the ban on midnight appointments extends to judicial appointments.

 

2.     Supervision of the JBC by the Court involves oversight. The subordinate subject to oversight must first act not in accord with prescribed rules before the act can be redone to conform to the prescribed rules.

 

3.     The Court erred in granting the petition in A.M. No. 10-2-5-SC, because the petition did not present a justiciable controversy.

 

Pimentel

 

 

1.     Any constitutional interpretative changes must be reasonable, rational, and conformable to the general intent of the Constitution as a limitation to the powers of Government and as a bastion for the protection of the rights of the people. Thus, in harmonizing seemingly conflicting provisions of the Constitution, the interpretation should always be one that protects the citizenry from an ever expanding grant of authority to its representatives.

 

2.     The decision expands the constitutional powers of the President in a manner totally repugnant to republican constitutional democracy, and is tantamount to a judicial amendment of the Constitution without proper authority.

 

 

Comments

 

 

The Office of the Solicitor General (OSG) and the JBC separately represent in their respective comments, thus:

 

 

OSG

 

1.                 The JBC may be compelled to submit to the President a short list of its nominees for the position of Chief Justice.

 

2.                 The incumbent President has the power to appoint the next Chief Justice.

 

3.                 Section 15, Article VII does not apply to the Judiciary.

 

4.                 The principles of constitutional construction favor the exemption of the Judiciary from the ban on midnight appointments.

 

5.                 The Court has the duty to consider and resolve all issues raised by the parties as well as other related matters.

 

JBC

 

1.                 The consolidated petitions should have been dismissed for prematurity, because the JBC has not yet decided at the time the petitions were filed whether the incumbent President has the power to appoint the new Chief Justice, and because the JBC, having yet to interview the candidates, has not submitted a short list to the President.

 

2.                 The statement in the decision that there is a doubt on whether a JBC short list is necessary for the President to appoint a Chief Justice should be struck down as bereft of constitutional and legal basis. The statement undermines the independence of the JBC.

 

3.                 The JBC will abide by the final decision of the Court, but in accord with its constitutional mandate and its implementing rules and regulations.

 

 

For his part, petitioner Estelito P. Mendoza (A.M. No. 10-2-5-SC) submits his comment even if the OSG and the JBC were the only ones the Court has required to do so. He states that the motions for reconsideration were directed at the administrative matter he initiated and which the Court resolved. His comment asserts:

 

1.                 The grounds of the motions for reconsideration were already resolved by the decision and the separate opinion.

 

2.                 The administrative matter he brought invoked the Courts power of supervision over the JBC as provided by Section 8(1), Article VIII of the Constitution, as distinguished from the Courts adjudicatory power under Section 1, Article VIII. In the former, the requisites for judicial review are not required, which was why Valenzuela was docketed as an administrative matter. Considering that the JBC itself has yet to take a position on when to submit the short list to the proper appointing authority, it has effectively solicited the exercise by the Court of its power of supervision over the JBC.

 

3.                 To apply Section 15, Article VII to Section 4(1) and Section 9, Article VIII is to amend the Constitution.

 

4.                 The portions of the deliberations of the Constitutional Commission quoted in the dissent of Justice Carpio Morales, as well as in some of the motions for reconsideration do not refer to either Section 15, Article VII or Section 4(1), Article VIII, but to Section 13, Article VII (on nepotism).

 

Ruling

 

 

We deny the motions for reconsideration for lack of merit, for all the matters being thereby raised and argued, not being new, have all been resolved by the decision of March 17, 2010.

 

Nonetheless, the Court opts to dwell on some matters only for the purpose of clarification and emphasis.

 

First: Most of the movants contend that the principle of stare decisis is controlling, and accordingly insist that the Court has erred in disobeying or abandoning Valenzuela.[1]

 

The contention has no basis.

 

Stare decisis derives its name from the Latin maxim stare decisis et non quieta movere, i.e., to adhere to precedent and not to unsettle things that are settled. It simply means that a principle underlying the decision in one case is deemed of imperative authority, controlling the decisions of like cases in the same court and in lower courts within the same jurisdiction, unless and until the decision in question is reversed or overruled by a court of competent authority. The decisions relied upon as precedents are commonly those of appellate courts, because the decisions of the trial courts may be appealed to higher courts and for that reason are probably not the best evidence of the rules of law laid down. [2]

 

Judicial decisions assume the same authority as a statute itself and, until authoritatively abandoned, necessarily become, to the extent that they are applicable, the criteria that must control the actuations, not only of those called upon to abide by them, but also of those duty-bound to enforce obedience to them.[3] In a hierarchical judicial system like ours, the decisions of the higher courts bind the lower courts, but the courts of co-ordinate authority do not bind each other. The one highest court does not bind itself, being invested with the innate authority to rule according to its best lights.[4]

 

The Court, as the highest court of the land, may be guided but is not controlled by precedent. Thus, the Court, especially with a new membership, is not obliged to follow blindly a particular decision that it determines, after re-examination, to call for a rectification.[5] The adherence to precedents is strict and rigid in a common-law setting like the United Kingdom, where judges make law as binding as an Act of Parliament.[6] But ours is not a common-law system; hence, judicial precedents are not always strictly and rigidly followed. A judicial pronouncement in an earlier decision may be followed as a precedent in a subsequent case only when its reasoning and justification are relevant, and the court in the latter case accepts such reasoning and justification to be applicable to the case. The application of the precedent is for the sake of convenience and stability.

 

For the intervenors to insist that Valenzuela ought not to be disobeyed, or abandoned, or reversed, and that its wisdom should guide, if not control, the Court in this case is, therefore, devoid of rationality and foundation. They seem to conveniently forget that the Constitution itself recognizes the innate authority of the Court en banc to modify or reverse a doctrine or principle of law laid down in any decision rendered en banc or in division.[7]

 

Second: Some intervenors are grossly misleading the public by their insistence that the Constitutional Commission extended to the Judiciary the ban on presidential appointments during the period stated in Section 15, Article VII.

 

The deliberations that the dissent of Justice Carpio Morales quoted from the records of the Constitutional Commission did not concern either Section 15, Article VII or Section 4(1), Article VIII, but only Section 13, Article VII, a provision on nepotism. The records of the Constitutional Commission show that Commissioner Hilario G. Davide, Jr. had proposed to include judges and justices related to the President within the fourth civil degree of consanguinity or affinity among the persons whom the President might not appoint during his or her tenure. In the end, however, Commissioner Davide, Jr. withdrew the proposal to include the Judiciary in Section 13, Article VII (t)o avoid any further complication,[8] such that the final version of the second paragraph of Section 13, Article VII even completely omits any reference to the Judiciary, to wit:

 

Section 13. xxx

 

The spouse and relatives by consanguinity or affinity within the fourth civil degree of the President shall not during his tenure be appointed as Members of the Constitutional Commissions, or the Office of the Ombudsman, or as Secretaries, Undersecretaries, chairmen or heads of bureaus or offices, including government-owned or controlled corporations and their subsidiaries.

Last: The movants take the majority to task for holding that Section 15, Article VII does not apply to appointments in the Judiciary. They aver that the Court either ignored or refused to apply many principles of statutory construction.

 

The movants gravely err in their posture, and are themselves apparently contravening their avowed reliance on the principles of statutory construction.

 

For one, the movants, disregarding the absence from Section 15, Article VII of the express extension of the ban on appointments to the Judiciary, insist that the ban applied to the Judiciary under the principle of verba legis. That is self-contradiction at its worst.

 

Another instance is the movants unhesitating willingness to read into Section 4(1) and Section 9, both of Article VIII, the express applicability of the ban under Section 15, Article VII during the period provided therein, despite the silence of said provisions thereon. Yet, construction cannot supply the omission, for doing so would generally constitute an encroachment upon the field of the Constitutional Commission. Rather, Section 4(1) and Section 9 should be left as they are, given that their meaning is clear and explicit, and no words can be interpolated in them.[9] Interpolation of words is unnecessary, because the law is more than likely to fail to express the legislative intent with the interpolation. In other words, the addition of new words may alter the thought intended to be conveyed. And, even where the meaning of the law is clear and sensible, either with or without the omitted word or words, interpolation is improper, because the primary source of the legislative intent is in the language of the law itself.[10]

 

Thus, the decision of March 17, 2010 has fittingly observed:

 

Had the framers intended to extend the prohibition contained in Section 15, Article VII to the appointment of Members of the Supreme Court, they could have explicitly done so. They could not have ignored the meticulous ordering of the provisions. They would have easily and surely written the prohibition made explicit in Section 15, Article VII as being equally applicable to the appointment of Members of the Supreme Court in Article VIII itself, most likely in Section 4 (1), Article VIII. That such specification was not done only reveals that the prohibition against the President or Acting President making appointments within two months before the next presidential elections and up to the end of the Presidents or Acting Presidents term does not refer to the Members of the Supreme Court.

 

We cannot permit the meaning of the Constitution to be stretched to any unintended point in order to suit the purposes of any quarter.

Final Word

 

It has been insinuated as part of the polemics attendant to the controversy we are resolving that because all the Members of the present Court were appointed by the incumbent President, a majority of them are now granting to her the authority to appoint the successor of the retiring Chief Justice.

 

The insinuation is misguided and utterly unfair.

 

The Members of the Court vote on the sole basis of their conscience and the merits of the issues. Any claim to the contrary proceeds from malice and condescension. Neither the outgoing President nor the present Members of the Court had arranged the current situation to happen and to evolve as it has. None of the Members of the Court could have prevented the Members composing the Court when she assumed the Presidency about a decade ago from retiring during her prolonged term and tenure, for their retirements were mandatory. Yet, she is now left with an imperative duty under the Constitution to fill up the vacancies created by such inexorable retirements within 90 days from their occurrence. Her official duty she must comply with. So must we ours who are tasked by the Constitution to settle the controversy.

 

ACCORDINGLY, the motions for reconsideration are denied with finality.

 

SO ORDERED.

 

 

 

 

LUCAS P. BERSAMIN

Associate Justice

 

 

WE CONCUR:

 

 

 

 

REYNATO S. PUNO

Chief Justice

 

 

 

 

ANTONIO T. CARPIO RENATO C. CORONA

Associate Justice Associate Justice

 

 

 

 

CONCHITA CARPIO MORALES PRESBITERO J. VELASCO, JR.

Associate Justice Associate Justice

 

 

 

 

ANTONIO EDUARDO B. NACHURA TERESITA J. LEONARDO-DE CASTRO

Associate Justice Associate Justice

 

 

 

 

ARTURO D. BRION DIOSDADO M. PERALTA

Associate Justice Associate Justice

 

 

 

 

MARIANO C. DEL CASTILLO ROBERTO A. ABAD

Associate Justice Associate Justice

 

 

 

 

MARTIN S. VILLARAMA, JR. JOSE PORTUGAL PEREZ

Associate Justice Associate Justice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JOSE CATRAL MENDOZA

Associate Justice

 

 

 

C E R T I F I C A T I O N

 

 

Pursuant to Section 13, Article VIII of the Constitution, it is hereby certified that the conclusions in the above Resolution had been reached in consultation before the case was assigned to the writer of the opinion of the Court.

 

 

 

 

REYNATO S. PUNO

Chief Justice

 



[1] In Re Appointments Dated March 30, 1998 of Hon. Mateo A. Valenzuela and Hon. Placido B. Vallarta as Judges of the Regional Trial Court of Branch 62, Bago City and of Branch 24, Cabanatuan City, respectively, A.M. No. 98-5-01-SC, November 9, 1998, 298 SCRA 408.

[2] Price & Bitner, Effective Legal Research, Little, Brown & Co., New York (1962), 9.7.

[3] Caltex (Phil.), Inc. v. Palomar, No. L-19650, September 29, 1966, 18 SCRA 247

[4] E.g., Dias, Jurisprudence, Butterworths, London, 1985, Fifth Edition, p. 127.

[5] Limketkai Sons Milling, Inc. v. Court of Appeals, G.R. No. 118509, September 5, 1996, 261 SCRA 464.

[6] See Calabresi, A Common Law for the Age of Statutes, Harvard University Press, p. 4 (1982) and endnote 12 of the page, which essentially recounts that the strict application of the doctrine of stare decisis is true only in a common-law jurisdiction like England (citing Wise, The Doctrine of Stare Decisis, 21 Wayne Law Review, 1043, 1046-1047 (1975). Calabresi recalls that the English House of Lords decided in 1898 (London Tramways Co. v. London County Council, A.C. 375) that they could not alter precedents laid down by the House of Lords acting as the supreme court in previous cases, but that such precedents could only be altered by an Act of Parliament, for to do otherwise would mean that the courts would usurp legislative function; he mentions that in 1966, Lord Chancellor Gardiner announced in a Practice Statement a kind of general memorandum from the court that while: Their Lordships regard the use of precedent as an indispensable foundation upon which to decide what is the law, they nevertheless recognize that too rigid adherence to precedent may lead to injustice in a particular case and also unduly restrict the proper development of the law. They propose, therefore, to modify their present practice and, while treating former decisions of this House as normally binding, to depart from a previous decision when it appears right to do so. (Calabresi cites Leach, Revisionism in the House of Lords: The Bastion of Rigid Stare Decisis Falls, 80 Harvard Law Review, 797 (1967).

[7] Section 4 (2), Article VIII, provides:

xxx

(3) Cases or matters heard by a division shall be decided or resolved with the concurrence of a majority of the Members who actually took part in the deliberations on the issues in the case and voted thereon, and in no case, without the concurrence of at least three of such Members. When the required number is not obtained, the case shall be decided en banc; Provided, that no doctrine or principle of law laid down by the court in a decision rendered en banc or in division may be modified or reversed except by the court sitting en banc.

[8] Record of the 1986 Constitutional Commission, Vol. 2, July 31, 1986, RCC No. 44. pp. 542-543.

[9] Smith v. State, 66 Md. 215, 7 Atl. 49.

[10] State ex rel Everding v. Simon, 20 Ore. 365, 26 Pac. 170.